Friday, December 13, 2019

Election 2019 : The failure of politics

I haven't really been writing politically here.

I've been writing more on Quora, where at least there's some kind of audience.

But this started as an answer today, and wandered so far away from the original question, that I realize it needs a different home.

So here it is, my take on the disastrous UK elections of December 2019.

Originally launched as an answer to the question : How damaging is the general election defeat to Jeremy Corbyn?


Corbyn himself is gone.

Toast.

That’s the rules of the game. No leader survives this. I don’t suppose he thinks any differently.

The fight is about what the defeat “really means” and what it implies for Labour.

And how much of his legacy is going to be preserved vs. jettisoned.

How damaging is this defeat to, for want of a better word, “Corbynism” within Labour?

The defeat doesn’t change the underlying fact that the Labour “coalition” is fragmenting into increasingly distinct factions with fewer interests and even less “consciousness” in common. In fact, this defeat simply re-emphasizes that.

I’d hoped - and I admit that in retrospect this was wishful thinking - that Labour’s policies like the neutral stance on Brexit, and the bold promises to redistribute wealth to the poorest people and regions, might have held that coalition together sufficiently to at least force a draw with the Tories in this election.

But I was wrong.

The collapse of the “red wall” is pretty strong evidence that the Labour coalition HAS collapsed.

People rejected Labour for all kinds of reasons. And undoubtedly perception of Corbyn personally and his history were part of that. But it’s clear that a whole tranche of people in those crucial Northern seats abandoned Labour because they wanted to see Brexit “done”. They gave their votes either to the Brexit Party or Tories. Relatively fewer switched Lib Dem or Green, which is what you might have expected if it was largely an anti-Corbyn vote by people otherwise sticking to their political compass. No, this was a pro-Brexit vote.

The original Brexit referendum had allowed those people to see Boris as on the same “team” as them; which obviously made them feel warmer towards him than they had felt to someone like Theresa May. And then Labour’s perceived bait-and-switch (campaigning as committed to Brexit in 2017, to advocating a second referendum in 2019) discredited Corbyn with those Leavers. And once that had happened, other negatives they read about Corbyn in the Tory press resonated with them too.

Hold on … even as I write this, I realize that I’ve wandered off the point …

There are many narratives about why Corbyn failed. But the real issue is not which one is “right”.

The real issue is that each speaks to a different fragment of the disintegrating coalition.

The story I gave above makes sense to me. And people in my faction. But there’s a story that makes sense to those people who said from the start that Corbyn is a disaster.

There are people who didn’t like Corbyn because he was too Brexity. And people who didn’t like Corbyn because he was too Remainy. There were people who didn’t like Corbyn because he was a throwback to old Labour of the 1970s. And people who had enthusiastically voted for that old Labour in the 70s but didn’t like him because he was a middle-class London metropolitan who was “out of touch” with working people.

Whichever of those problems you had with Labour, they are really a reflection of which fragment of the disintegrating Labour coalition you are part of.

And those different factions aren’t coming back together just because Labour replaces Corbyn with a different leader. They increasingly dislike each other.

The Leave working class and the Remainer middle class in London don’t just disagree. They are antagonistic. They think the others are “the problem”. They will reject a politician who they associated with the other side.

This is the culture war which has been bubbling away within Brexit.

I supported Corbyn.

Enthusiastically.

Because I thought that at least he was trying to address that problem. He was aware of the factions coming apart. And his policies and stances were explicit attempts to hold the Labour coalition together. (Whereas his critics rarely seemed to acknowledge the issue at all and were happy just to push for their particular faction’s politics.)

Nevertheless, Corbyn failed; he couldn’t manage to be all things to all these different groups. And the rules of the game are that he now has to go.

That’s fair.

But I don’t see how any other Labour politician can pull those parts back together either.

The debate is already kicking off about whether another politician from London fits the bill. Or whether it needs to be someone from the North. Because … identity, I suppose. The pro-Corbyn faction will insist that the momentum of the Corbyn swing to the left is kept up. Because what’s the point of Labour winning power if it doesn’t do anything useful with it? And the right-wing of Labour will insist that Labour pulls back to the right, because what’s the point of a “magnificent manifesto” if you never get near implementing it?

Is there a right "solution" to that problem? Can all these factions be brought back under a single umbrella?

Aditya Chakrabortty had a good column yesterday in which he points out that from the perspective of Pontypool “The Westminster lot were all “liars” and London was a leech, always hungry for more … This is what decades of distrust produces. Not magical thinking or unstinting belief in posh-boy fairytales, but a deep and sullen resentment. A nihilism that neither party nor any other democratic institution can even get their hands around, let alone find a response to.”

People are sick to death of politicians. They don’t believe their vote can do any practical good. So they might as well vote for “symbolic” things like sovereignty or “Britishness” which at least look like something that “belongs to them” and they can participate in. Whereas the jobs are never coming back and the new hospitals will never get built, despite all the promises in the manifestos, so why vote on those issues?

That’s what really did for Labour in these elections. Apathy and despair. Some of the collapsed “red wall” seats, turn-out was down at 52%.

Corbyn is not just damaged, he’s destroyed by this failure. But he failed because of a much deeper damage. The destruction of faith in politics.

This is what is deeply depressing today. Say what you like about Corbyn’s Labour project. However much you thought Corbyn came across badly. Or had dodgy connections. Or that Labour’s plans were unrealistic. This was a real political project, noting real problems, and offering real solutions to them.

Boris Johnson produces a good upbeat impression of politics. But even the people who voted for Johnson don’t actually believe it or trust him. They voted for the spectacle of of a bumptious toff offering fake solutions (an “oven-ready deal”) to a fake problem (the EU).

And as vox-pop after vox-pop shows. The people who voted for him against Corbyn don’t even believe that he’s telling them the truth or will actually do anything for them.

They voted for the spectacle itself.

Obviously, I find that bewildering. And maybe you do too.

But you should realize that if your focus is on Jeremy Corbyn, and what this election means for him. Or what it means for his faction within Labour, you’re missing the bigger picture.

This is our real problem. The destruction of the belief that a political party can do anything at all.

Wednesday, October 02, 2019

My Music

Inspired by a Quora answer I gave today. Do I listen to my own music?


I’m currently in a phase of listening heavily to my own music. Particularly my work-in-progress.

And really enjoying it.

In fact, I’m probably not sufficiently objective or critical of it. I find the slapdash sketchiness of it charming rather than problematic. ;-) 

It does what I want from music, it has the kind of tunes I like, against the kind of instrumentation I like, and rhythms I like, and experimentation I like. Without anything that I don’t like. Or which I find unnecessary.

Now, at the same time, I wish it was better. I wish it was more skilful. I wish it was less repetitive. (It is, I have to admit, very repetitive, made on looping DAW software). I really wish I was better at music. I wish it was more sophisticated. More elegant. More trendy and more admired. And certainly I wish it was better mixed and mastered to sound better on other people’s sound systems.

But I no longer wish it was different. I don’t wish it was somehow closer to genre norms, or more like artist X. It’s exactly like artist ME, in the kind of messy between-genre that I make. And that’s exactly what I want to make and want to listen to.

I struggle to be objective. I see flaws. But I don’t know how to improve on them. Every time I go to change something I feel that I’m losing something as well as gaining. And that’s hard to handle. I know that hurts the objective quality. I’m sure everyone else will hate the music because the flaws glaring at them.
 
That’s the (possibly not very) strange paradox. I simultaneously don’t trust the music is good enough for anyone else to like. But it’s the only thing that I could like this much.

Friday, September 13, 2019

New EP : Fernanda Design Tree, on BandCamp, SoundCloud etc.

I'm back to doing a lot of music at the moment.

Particularly cleaning up old sketches and half-finished tracks and polishing them into something that rest of the world might actually want to listen to.

This week I launched my new EP on BandCamp.


 

Friday, June 21, 2019

"If even modestly successful, Libra would hand over much of the control of monetary policy from central banks to these private companies,” said Hughes, a co-chair of the Economic Security Project, an anti-poverty campaign group. “If global regulators don’t act now, it could very soon be too late."

Facebook co-founder: Libra currency could give firms excess power

Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Blogger

Meanwhile ... WTF Google?

You just don't care at all, do you?

How come Blogger in 2019 still doesn't have Markdown input as an option?

It's lack of attention to details like that which means you lost Google+. You still have Blogger as a social play. It could still be great. But you won't put any energy into making it better.

Facebook Libra

It's over.

Facebook finally conquered the world.

And not in the way we usually say companies "conquered the world".

I mean they already own our social network (ie. all our friends and relationships) and have become the only way that people can talk to each other. Now they will become money and be the only way people can pay each other.

I don't have a FB account. That means I am continually excluded by default from a range of things that people send information about. I miss events because they are posted on Facebook and Instagram and nobody remembers to use an alternative channel which I might see.

Tomorrow I might not even be able to be paid without being signed up to have Facebook as my Identity Provider.

With Uber signed up, I might not even be able to find work without Facebook's permission.

Here's a hint to the nation states of the world. If you want to still be in business in 20 or 30 years, ban Facebook Libra NOW!

Tuesday, April 16, 2019

Monday, January 14, 2019

Music 2019

Some music related stuff I've been doing recently.

Here's a quick recap :

I wrote a "Global Ear" column for The Wire magazine on the Brasilia underground / noise / experimental scene. And made a playlist you can listen to now.

You want to know about the future genres of music? Check this recent Quora answer I wrote about CineBeat.

Want to make Trap in Sonic Pi? Watch my video tutorial.

Tuesday, September 04, 2018

Month of Patterning extended ...

I've made some progress on the Month of Patterning in August. But not everything is ready or up ... so ... the month of Patterning is being extended into September. Two for the price of one :-)

Saturday, August 11, 2018

Meet the Turtorial

Uploaded a "Turtorial" to the Patterning tutorial.

It shows you how to use the built-in "turtle" and "l-system" functionality of Patterning to create more organic forms.

Friday, August 03, 2018

The new Alchemy Islands

I've just refreshed the Alchemy Islands site.

That's home to Patterning and now some other old "algorithmic design" and crazy art projects.

All of which are in the process of being refreshed.

August is Patterning-month, so the focus is there.

I finally sat down and played with devcards the other day, a wonderful innovation in ClojureScript world that let you write and test small fragments of UI code in self-contained "cards".

I've used this to redo the Patterning tutorials, so now you get can see tutorial pages like this, where the code is actually running live in the browser. (Note it might take a few seconds to render, even more on a cellphone.) But yeah, the whole library is running in the browser and generating those patterns live, thanks to ClojureScript.

As always, props to the awesome geniuses of the Clojure / ClojureScript world.

Wednesday, August 01, 2018

A Month of Patterning

August is Patterning month again.

I'm back to work on the Patterning library. And, in particular, getting it working properly in the ClojureScript, in-browser version. I'm going to be using devcards, figwheel, spec and other good tools in the Clojure community.

I'll be revamping the site, posting new images here, and new versions of the code.

Watch this space ...

Saturday, June 30, 2018

This part of town. My corner of the internet.

It's basically becoming a derelict wasteland. It's falling to pieces. Neglected. The flows of life, of information, of "voice" have moved elsewhere.

I've successfully avoided the clutches of Facebook and Instagram and Whatsapp. Only to be similarly addicted to Quora. And increasingly dependent on Telegram for actual social stuff.

I have online existence. But not "here".

And I'm not only talking about this blog : Composing.

I'm talking about many of my online presences.

I'm talking about ThoughtStorms wiki, which has retreated from an open forum for debate. Via the idea of the Smallest Federated Wiki to a closed, but federal. To now an entirely personal closed thinking space. Perhaps inevitably, given the increasingly hostility to be found online. But is now full of outdated, half-baked, deprecated ideas.


I'm talking about my so called home-page which is now three years out-of-date.

I'm talking about the presentations of my projects which are languishing on public but unvisited static pages. Because, again, these aren't part of the flows  of life.

I am no longer living "publicly", putting what I do online. I don't even know if I want to be living "publicly" in such a way today.

Or to put it another way. I fragment over various places online and IRL. And each fragment has freedom to be what it wants. Unconstrained by the other fragments. How much do I want to try to reunite and reintegrate my fragmented personality? Or do I enjoy the small sense of "privacy" that remains when I allow these fragments to have independent lives of their own? Is becoming the "dividual" the only way to avoid being signed, sealed and delivered into the hands of the machine learning mind controllers today?

But how do you even "live" in a world where "existence" is increasingly tied to participating in the right flows?

Don't ask me. I have no fucking idea.

But ... what I do know is that it's a mess around here. So ... it's time to knock down a lot of stuff and build something new.

So ... in the next few months, I'm going to blow up this blog : Composing. I'm going to be blowing up Synaesmedia. And, perhaps most shockingly, I'm going to be blowing up ThoughtStorms Wiki. And a bunch of other sites.

None of that means that everything is going away entirely. 

What's still valuable will come back in some form.

But I'm going to make big changes. I'm going to break links. (Who cares about broken links?) I'm going to break names (what do my names even mean? Alchemy Islands? Gbloink? Mind Traffic Control? Why are they stuck with the crumbling signifieds they're currently pointing to?) I'm going to break online libraries. (Is anyone really using the ThoughtStorms libraries? If so, pay close attention to what's happening in the online repos)

I just over a year, I want to have achieved a thorough clearing out of the junk and cruft from my online life. And be focused on fewer, more live and dynamic, channels, better suited to today's internet and my current interests.

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Gary Younge knocks it out of the park :

If ever there was an illustration of how a system of patriarchy demeans and depletes us all, this is it. Unable to take advantage of the male privileges they believe they are owed, they feel inadequate and grow resentful, and a handful become violent. Often awkward, shy and unconfident, they cannot meet the standards of machismo that patriarchy demands. They think feminism will destroy them. But in fact it is their greatest chance of liberation, since the less women are forced to conform to preconceived notions of femininity, the more space there is within masculinity for them to be themselves. As such, they are not only the perpetrators of misogyny but the products and, ultimately, the victims of it.

Friday, March 16, 2018


Improvisation using some of my new software for BSBLOrk.